AB102. 24. Patient’s perceptions of physical examination in the setting of chronic pain
Anaesthesia Session

AB102. 24. Patient’s perceptions of physical examination in the setting of chronic pain

Mohamed Hashim, Deidre Edgeworth, Dominic Harmon

Department of Anaesthesia, Limerick University Hospital, Limerick, Ireland


Background: Despite its clinical utility, progressive reliance on technology can lead to devaluing the physical examination in patients with chronic pain. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether these patients have a positive or negative perception of the physical examination.

Methods: After institutional ethics committee approval a convenience sample of 100 adult patients who suffer from chronic pain were included. Participants completed a questionnaire that included a variety of questions with responses reported using a Likert scale. A 20-item survey regarding their overall perception of the physical examination was used.

Results: The most frequent age reported was 50–70 years in 48% of respondents and the most frequent pain complaint was back pain (65%). Most patients (83%) indicated that the overall experience of being examined was highly positive [median score, 4; interquartile range (IQR), 2–5; P<0.0001].

Conclusions: Patients with chronic pain indicate that the physical examination is a highly positive aspect of their care.

Keywords: Physical examination; patient; pain


doi: 10.21037/map.2018.AB102


Cite this abstract as: Hashim M, Edgeworth D, Harmon D. Patient’s perceptions of physical examination in the setting of chronic pain. Mesentery Peritoneum 2018;2:AB102. doi: 10.21037/map.2018.AB102