AB265. Surgical site infection post caesarean section
Gynae Posters

AB265. Surgical site infection post caesarean section

Claire Healy1, Richard Greene2, Ray O’Connor1

1Department of Anaesthesia, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland


Background: A Caesarean section (CS) is a common, yet major, procedure, both electively and in emergencies. Although it is a regularly performed operation, like all surgeries, it carries risks. One such risk is the development of surgical site infections (SSI). While in hospital after giving birth, women’s wounds are regularly monitored. However, on leaving the hospital, there is limited specific follow-up.

Methods: One hundred and three women who had given birth by Caesarean section in Cork University Maternity Hospital were recruited during their 4-day postnatal stay. They consented to anonymous data being extracted from their charts and a shortened version of a pre-piloted questionnaire filled out. These women are followed-up day 42 postpartum to discuss the care received, how their wound had healed and if any infection had developed.

Results: Of the 103 women recruited, 63 responded when contacted at 6 weeks post-partum via email or phone (patient specified preference at time of first meeting) to questionnaire regarding infection. Of those who had developed an infection, 66.67% were emergency cases and 33.33% were elective. 75% were non- or ex-smokers. Only 1 case took greater than 60 minutes. Most women were fit and well at baseline but 33.33% did suffer from an autoimmune disease. Number of previous CS did not seem affect results.

Conclusions: The risk of developing SSI in the 6 weeks post CS is multifaceted. Emergency CS appeared to be the only studied factor contributing to risk. Further study is needed to identify alternative risk factors and to minimize SSI development following CS is warranted to ensure new mothers have the best possible outcomes.

Keywords: Caesarean section; surgical site infection (SSI); post operative care; postpartum infection; postpartum wound care


doi: 10.21037/map.2020.AB265
Cite this abstract as: Healy C, Greene R, O’Connor R. Surgical site infection post caesarean section. Mesentery Peritoneum 2020;4:AB265.